fbpx

Wayang Girl

Wayang Girl

Amber is excited at her new birthday present from Uncle John – a pair of cymbals. But Mother is not happy when Amber marches around the house, banging the cymbals all day long.

She says Amber is a “whole noisy Wayang rolled up in one small girl”. Amber is curious. She has never heard of the Wayang before. Join Amber as she learns all about Singapore’s traditional street opera with the help of two elderly friends.

In the past few years, local historian/writer Ho Lee-Ling has been busy writing books for children based on Singapore’s rich history. In between writing Samsui Girl, Wayang Girl and Gasing Boy, Lee-Ling was working on commissioned works.


Print publisher: The History Workroom

Author: Ho Lee-Ling

Ho Lee-Ling is a Singapore writer and researcher. As former teacher and museum educator, she is passionate about researching and writing books about the Singapore experience especially for children. Her first book, Samsui Girl, was awarded a First-Time Writers & Illustrators Publishing grant in 2006. She has since written many other titles including picture books such as MJ’s classroom series.


Get the book here:



Our values are the daily beat to which we jive.

×
Our Story
Tusitala was born in 2010, with a focus on telling transmedia stories. We’re based in Singapore, perfectly poised to represent the breadth and depth of Asian content available in the region. With the world increasingly looking towards Asian stories, we’re both excited and proud to be where we are!

The name Tusitala harks to an island in Samoa, where author Robert Louis Stevenson spent the last years of his life. The locals of the island fondly nicknamed him Tusitala, which means storyteller. In our work, we embody the essence of a storyteller: using different mediums and techniques to deliver a powerful message to our audiences. Only, we take it a step further by introducing the exciting potential of technology.

Our logo is a kitsune – nine-tailed fox, native to Asian folklore and legend. In Chinese, Japanese and Korean folktales, the kitsune is an enchanted animal – magnetic, intelligent, powerful, and able to take human form. From the complexity of the symbolism, we derive simple principles that we stand for – potency, wisdom and creative rebellion.

(This creativity, we must disclose, often vanishes when determining where we should go for lunch each day)

×
Web Applications Developer

Description

Must Have

Should Have

Nice to Have (Advantageous)

Email your resume, github url, OS preferece, expected salary to hr@tusi.sg.

×